Public Hearing for Water Rate Increase

Public Hearing for Water Rate Increase

Posted in the Blue Island Forum

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CASA

Blue Island, IL

#1 Oct 23, 2017
2nd hearing:
Thursday, October 26th at 7:00pm
City Hall- East Annex 2434 Vermont St. B.I.
Good people of Blue Island, this is our opportunity to speak up on the city council proposal to raise our water rates by 30%. Your Voice Matters!
Change Is Needed

Midlothian, IL

#2 Oct 23, 2017
CASA wrote:
2nd hearing:
Thursday, October 26th at 7:00pm
City Hall- East Annex 2434 Vermont St. B.I.
Good people of Blue Island, this is our opportunity to speak up on the city council proposal to raise our water rates by 30%. Your Voice Matters!
Not to Rita but still express yourself for the record.
CASA

Blue Island, IL

#3 Oct 23, 2017
Change Is Needed wrote:
<quoted text>
Not to Rita but still express yourself for the record.
In a few months, the Blue Island independent party will be coming around and wanting your vote. That will be a very good time to remind them about this water rate increase and why you will not be voting for them.
Keep it Short

Alsip, IL

#4 Oct 23, 2017
CASA wrote:
<quoted text>
In a few months, the Blue Island independent party will be coming around and wanting your vote. That will be a very good time to remind them about this water rate increase and why you will not be voting for them.
It is recommended you simply state; I’m sorry I don’t know that person so I can’t sign that for you.
CASA

Blue Island, IL

#5 Oct 24, 2017
Keep it Short wrote:
<quoted text>

It is recommended you simply state; I’m sorry I don’t know that person so I can’t sign that for you.
Let people know that they should not assume your signature for a ballot petition or your vote.
Joy

Alsip, IL

#6 Oct 24, 2017
The gas bags who have over taxed us, followed and warmed seats in elected office must go.
MY WATER BILL IS TO HIGH

Blue Island, IL

#7 Oct 25, 2017
The monthly water bill is already overestimated monthly by 3,000 to 4,000 gallons per month!

How much more can the residents pay per month?

Manmade mother nature is doing a great job with supplying the rain!!!
Basement dewler

Blue Island, IL

#8 Oct 25, 2017
Hmm why not ask our esteemed woman hating leader how much he'd like to raise the rate? It's easy for him to throw out a number when it won't effect him living in mama and dadas basement. Must be nice to be the mayor and not have to pay any taxes or rate increases. Cool can't wait to vote for him again!
Duhmingo

United States

#9 Oct 25, 2017
Your three minutes are up
Bullheadedness

Blue Island, IL

#10 Oct 25, 2017
I will only need 1 minute to drag Vargas under the bus if he only gives me half a chance.
You'd best hope he doesn't.
Accountability

Alsip, IL

#11 Oct 26, 2017
Chicago Tribune Report Finds Black and Low-Income Residents Pay the Most for Water

Anne Branigin
Today 11:16am
Filed to: ENVIRONMENTAL RACISM

In America, being poor is expensive. Being poor and black is even more costly. A recent, must-read Chicago Tribune investigation illuminates precisely how by taking a look at one of the most basic human needs: water.

The Tribune analyzed how much different communities across the Chicago region were paying for water pumped from Lake Michigan and found that the median water bill for predominantly black communities was 20 percent higher than that of white communities for the same amount of water.

Not only that, but the lowest-income communities also paid more, period, than the wealthiest. According to the Tribune’s findings, the Chicago area’s poorest communities were paying nearly a third more for water than the most affluent ones.

As Robert Bullard, professor of urban planning and environmental justice at Texas Southern University, told the paper, it’s a textbook example of environmental injustice.

“People who have the lowest amount of money are forced to pay the most for basic services,” Bullard said.

The reason? Some community leaders told the Tribune that the high rates are because their residents have to pay for “significant amounts of water lost through cracked pipes and leaky hydrants.” Others explained that their decision to hike up rates was because they needed to replace poor infrastructure.

Only 13 percent of the communities surveyed by the Tribune for its investigation had a majority-black population. Still, of the 10 towns with the highest water rates, half of them were majority black.

The paper offered the following contrasts:

In Northfield, a high-income, predominantly white suburb, residents pay $36.34. In Posen, a majority-Latino south suburb where a quarter of the population lives below the poverty line, residents pay $64.60.

Residents of Glenwood, a lower-income, predominantly black community, pay $67.60. In the largely middle-income, predominantly white suburb of Willowbrook, residents pay $48.35.

And in Northbrook, a high-income, predominantly white community, residents pay less than $25. Consumers in Chicago Heights, a low-income, mixed-race community, pay nearly $36.&#65279;
The findings are significant because not only are the rates for low-income residents greater than for high-income Chicago-area residents, but those water fees also take a bigger chunk out of their monthly living expenses.

As the paper notes, there is little accountability on the part of community leaders to fix the disproportionately high cost of water for black and lower-income Chicago residents: Illinois doesn’t regulate or set water rates, leaving that up to local officials. And as the Tribune details, two towns in the Chicago area have come under investigation for water mismanagement and fraud.
Less is More

Alsip, IL

#12 Oct 26, 2017
There is very little oversight for municipal water utilities. Raising water or Sewer rates is unnecessary. Increases seem to typically be triggered by a bloated municipal workforce.

Removal of funds from the Water Fund (which should be separate from the General Fund) should not occur unless the Water System is properly managed.

BI’s Water System is not properly managed.
BI Deserves Better

Alsip, IL

#13 Oct 27, 2017
Less is More wrote:
There is very little oversight for municipal water utilities. Raising water or Sewer rates is unnecessary. Increases seem to typically be triggered by a bloated municipal workforce.

Removal of funds from the Water Fund (which should be separate from the General Fund) should not occur unless the Water System is properly managed.

BI’s Water System is not properly managed.
The informational meeting began with Dave Meyers presenting his same flawed information even after the Tribune “The Water Drain” Investigation.

There is in fact absolutely no reason and there are no mandates for any IL. municipality to raise water rates. There are communities that charge their taxpayers $0.00 for water.
There are IL EPA grants and low interest loans for water and sewer infrastructural improvements; negating ridiculous demands for exorbitant funds from taxpayers.

What is most clear is the municipality of BI Must to move to a balanced budget and live within its means or constantly hunt for revenue to support payroll by Gouging and Chiseling BI Taxpayers.)

Blue Island would also do best to promote its self as a family friendly community and offer incentives for doctors, medical personnel, teachers, fire and police officers to move to BI increasing the number of homeowners; simultaneously reducing vacancies.
Reality

United States

#14 Oct 27, 2017
Accountability wrote:
Chicago Tribune Report Finds Black and Low-Income Residents Pay the Most for Water

Anne Branigin
Today 11:16am
Filed to: ENVIRONMENTAL RACISM

In America, being poor is expensive. Being poor and black is even more costly. A recent, must-read Chicago Tribune investigation illuminates precisely how by taking a look at one of the most basic human needs: water.

The Tribune analyzed how much different communities across the Chicago region were paying for water pumped from Lake Michigan and found that the median water bill for predominantly black communities was 20 percent higher than that of white communities for the same amount of water.

Not only that, but the lowest-income communities also paid more, period, than the wealthiest. According to the Tribune’s findings, the Chicago area’s poorest communities were paying nearly a third more for water than the most affluent ones.

As Robert Bullard, professor of urban planning and environmental justice at Texas Southern University, told the paper, it’s a textbook example of environmental injustice.

“People who have the lowest amount of money are forced to pay the most for basic services,” Bullard said.

The reason? Some community leaders told the Tribune that the high rates are because their residents have to pay for “significant amounts of water lost through cracked pipes and leaky hydrants.” Others explained that their decision to hike up rates was because they needed to replace poor infrastructure.

Only 13 percent of the communities surveyed by the Tribune for its investigation had a majority-black population. Still, of the 10 towns with the highest water rates, half of them were majority black.

The paper offered the following contrasts:

In Northfield, a high-income, predominantly white suburb, residents pay $36.34. In Posen, a majority-Latino south suburb where a quarter of the population lives below the poverty line, residents pay $64.60.

Residents of Glenwood, a lower-income, predominantly black community, pay $67.60. In the largely middle-income, predominantly white suburb of Willowbrook, residents pay $48.35.

And in Northbrook, a high-income, predominantly white community, residents pay less than $25. Consumers in Chicago Heights, a low-income, mixed-race community, pay nearly $36.&#65279;
The findings are significant because not only are the rates for low-income residents greater than for high-income Chicago-area residents, but those water fees also take a bigger chunk out of their monthly living expenses.

As the paper notes, there is little accountability on the part of community leaders to fix the disproportionately high cost of water for black and lower-income Chicago residents: Illinois doesn’t regulate or set water rates, leaving that up to local officials. And as the Tribune details, two towns in the Chicago area have come under investigation for water mismanagement and fraud.
It’s because they vote Democrat. Democrats love to raise taxes and fees. They love making people incapable of earning their own incomes and instead making the poor depending on the government.
Meeting 2

Alsip, IL

#15 Oct 27, 2017
Time to Shine the Light

Blue Island, IL

#16 Oct 28, 2017
BI Deserves Better wrote:
<quoted text>

The informational meeting began with Dave Meyers presenting his same flawed information even after the Tribune “The Water Drain” Investigation.

There is in fact absolutely no reason and there are no mandates for any IL. municipality to raise water rates. There are communities that charge their taxpayers $0.00 for water.
There are IL EPA grants and low interest loans for water and sewer infrastructural improvements; negating ridiculous demands for exorbitant funds from taxpayers.

What is most clear is the municipality of BI Must to move to a balanced budget and live within its means or constantly hunt for revenue to support payroll by Gouging and Chiseling BI Taxpayers.)

Blue Island would also do best to promote its self as a family friendly community and offer incentives for doctors, medical personnel, teachers, fire and police officers to move to BI increasing the number of homeowners; simultaneously reducing vacancies.
The Forum newspaper protects the status quo. They have always been controlled by, and sold out to the city administration, The false reporting, has had a tremendous negative affect on Blue Island. It almost crosses the line of criminality.

We consider, acts of hate and bias unacceptable and antithetical to its commitment to an inclusive and respectful Blue Island community. And those involved must, and will be held accountable.
Pam

Blue Island, IL

#17 Oct 28, 2017
Meeting 2 wrote:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v= Omph46iUSVY

Must Watch
We noticed, the Rita Family relative sitting in the first row rocking back and forth.
Weehoo

Blue Island, IL

#18 Oct 28, 2017
Time to Shine the Light wrote:
<quoted text>

The Forum newspaper protects the status quo. They have always been controlled by, and sold out to the city administration, The false reporting, has had a tremendous negative affect on Blue Island. It almost crosses the line of criminality.

We consider, acts of hate and bias unacceptable and antithetical to its commitment to an inclusive and respectful Blue Island community. And those involved must, and will be held accountable.
We who ? I don't read the Forum anymore.
Huh

Blue Island, IL

#19 Oct 28, 2017
Pam wrote:
<quoted text>

We noticed, the Rita Family relative sitting in the first row rocking back and forth.
You mean Louie Gallo?
Investigate

Blue Island, IL

#20 Oct 29, 2017
Front page article today's Chicago Tribune, on water rates, a must read. State Rep Robert Rita ,is very wrong in what he is doing to Blue Island

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